Jungleland wasn‘t built in a day

Though in a sense every song that is released is complete, Bruce Springsteen’s “Jungleland” fulfills the deepest meaning of the word. From January 1974 to July 1975 Springsteen gradually chiseled the true character of the track out of its possibilities. He revised lyrics, rearranged movements, cut and added instruments and refined the track’s evolving compositions in rehearsals, recordings and performances with the E Street Band. The reward was a complete song, a “Jungleland” in thematic harmony with its album and with itself. (...)

https://betweenthelines.press/...tter_impression=true

 

Original Post

Only one of his songs was...built in a day that is. 

____________________________________

The SPL Rocks!

 

Pulled up to my house today
Came and took my little girl away!
Giants Stadium 8/28/03



Oats

 A really nice article.  As an aside... Magic Rat was the nickname of someone Bruce knew.

____________________________________

The SPL Rocks!

 

Pulled up to my house today
Came and took my little girl away!
Giants Stadium 8/28/03



Oats

It's really funny, Jungleland has been my favorite song of all time for the last 30 years even though I knew I really never understood a lot of it.  Even the beginning had me guessing.  Even the first words I never really got -

"The Rangers had a homecoming" - I kind of assumed "the rangers" were like a gang or something, led by Magic Rat.  It never dawned on me that it was a Vietnam reference which makes a lot more sense. 

Part of what I love about his music, it paints different pictures for everyone listening.

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Interesting article. What stood out to me is the comment Clarence made about him and Bruce creating the sax solo (All we could do was…smoke a lot of pot and try to stay calm). I thought Bruce never did drugs? This is a huge debate question that has been beaten to death I know.

I am not a professional anything, but the longest article I wrote for Brucebase was trying to tell the background of Jungleland. There is much written about Born to Run, it is good to see Jungleland getting some attention. I have extensive notes on all the lyrical changes, from live versions 1974 - March 75, then studio outtakes April-July 75. A lot has been removed for the sake of brevity, but there was a lot of information! 

people would jump onstage and grab me by the head and scream, ‘tilly! bootlegs!'"

@ChrsP posted:

Interesting article. What stood out to me is the comment Clarence made about him and Bruce creating the sax solo (All we could do was…smoke a lot of pot and try to stay calm). I thought Bruce never did drugs? This is a huge debate question that has been beaten to death I know.

Clarence smoked a lot of pot and needed to stay calm. Bruce is just a musical maniac.

people would jump onstage and grab me by the head and scream, ‘tilly! bootlegs!'"

Jungleland moments

August 1974 David Sancious leaves, and Roy Bittan joins. This had a huge effect, you can see the exit of jazz influence and Roy's style, from classical to Jerry Lee Lewis take over. I am not an expert, this is just what I heard. They were both great in their own ways, and probably deserve their share of credit for musical creativity. 

Mike Appel - Jon Landau & Mike April 13, 1975

914 Sound - Record Plant April 18, 1975

Luis Lahav - Jimmy Iovine April 18, 1975

Suki and her violin leave late March-early April 1975

These are the big changes that occurred beyond Bruce's process that had great effect on him. Remember, Suki's violin was recorded before she left, and dubbed onto the final track. The one outtake we have from 914 Sound Studios is of her singing at the ending, which was never used. 

 

  

people would jump onstage and grab me by the head and scream, ‘tilly! bootlegs!'"

Last edited by tillywilly

beneath the city two hearts beat, soul engines warm and tender
In a bedroom locked with silent whispers soft refusal and then surrender
In the tunnel of machines the Rat chases his dreams
footsteps echo down them hallways in night
the girl crawls into bed, shakes her head
And with a kiss and a sigh she shuts out the light

 

April 1975

people would jump onstage and grab me by the head and scream, ‘tilly! bootlegs!'"

Last edited by tillywilly

second verse April 1975

 

Well there’s a crazy kind of light tonight
Brighter than the one that sparkles for prophets
brighter than the Giant Exxon sign that brings this fair city light
There’s an opera out on the Turnpike, there’s a ballet being fought out on the alley
the local cops, Cherry top rips this holy night
The streets on fire with tough-kid Jets in Nova-light machines
Boys flash guitars like bayonets and rip holes in their jean
The hungry and the hunted explode into rock and roll bands
They face off against each other in the street down in Jungleland

people would jump onstage and grab me by the head and scream, ‘tilly! bootlegs!'"

Jungleland 1974-12-06 

Geneva 10:13

 

suki violin intro
bells 0:50

the Rangers had a home coming in Harlem late last night
And the Magic Rat drove his beautiful machine over the Jersey State Line
Barefoot girl sits drinking warm beer on the hood of an old Dodge in the soft summer rain
the Rat pulls into town, rolls up his pants, together they take a stab at romance and disapear down Flamingo Lane

now the maximum lawmen they run down Flamingo chasing the Rat And the barefoot girl
the kids down there live just like shadows always silent, holding hands
from the churches to the jails tonight tonight there is silence in the world
as we take our stand down in Jungleland

Well there’s a crazy kind of light tonight
Brighter than the one that sparkles for prophets
Brighter than that Giant Exxon sign that brings this fair city light
There’s an opera out on the Turnpike, there’s a ballet being fought out in the alley
the cops they let their faces show and rips this holy night
The streets alive with tough-kid Jets in Nova-light machines
Boys flash guitars like bayonets and rip holes in their jeans
the hungry and the hunted explode into rock ‘n’ roll bands
and face off against each other in the street
Down in Jungleland

322 sax solo

353
In the parking lot the visionaries dress in the latest rage
As the Spanish Angels dance soft and low in a blacked arcade
But the lights are so dim as he crosses the room, the band moves into the song
He looks in her eyes, takes her hand and they’re gone, gone

415 long guitar solo with violin and sax

727
Beneath the city two hearts beat, soul engines warm and tender
In a bedroom locked in silent whispers of soft refusal and then surrender
In the tunnel of machines the Rat chases his dreams
On that forever lasting night, until the barefoot girl crawls into bed, shakes her head
And with a kiss and a sigh she shuts out the light

Outside the street’s on fire in a real death waltz Between what's flesh and fantasy
and the poets down here don’t write nothin’ at all, they just stand back and let it all be
And in the quick of the night they reach for their moment and try make an honest stand
But they wind up wounded, and not even dead, tonight in Jungleland

 

people would jump onstage and grab me by the head and scream, ‘tilly! bootlegs!'"

@DenverBrian posted:

It's really funny, Jungleland has been my favorite song of all time for the last 30 years even though I knew I really never understood a lot of it.  Even the beginning had me guessing.  Even the first words I never really got -

"The Rangers had a homecoming" - I kind of assumed "the rangers" were like a gang or something, led by Magic Rat.  It never dawned on me that it was a Vietnam reference which makes a lot more sense. 

Part of what I love about his music, it paints different pictures for everyone listening.

Me too. Reading this article put parts of the song in a complete different view for me. Never did I think this could relate to a homecoming veteran, always thought it’s more about gangs and bands. 

well maybe that’s part of the magic our boss is able to create. Not only when you hear something new in his recordings even if you listened more than a hundred times to that specific song. Maybe a short organ  line in the background or Garry goin’ wild for a second. Something you never been aware of before. Maybe the older you get the more of a different picture one song of the boss is painting for you. It hits you bold and stark at 16 giving you the feel of “that’s exactly the way I’m feeling right now” where the same song 25 years later as a father still gives you the feel of “that’s exactly the way I’m feeling right now”. Pure magic of making every generation “feel at home” in your songs. 

 
Glad to be part of the ride...

Last edited by Spechti

No it's both... that's just the author's interpretation.  You were both on the right track.

The Magic Rat was the nickname of a real guy.  He was a veteran but when he came back from Viet Nam he joined a motorcycle gang.  Although they likened it to a club.

The same gang Gunner was in. 

____________________________________

The SPL Rocks!

 

Pulled up to my house today
Came and took my little girl away!
Giants Stadium 8/28/03



Oats

I think the author of the article should have worked on it for another 18 months. That was hard on the eyes to read.

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