Some bands use their IEM system to communicate with one another, by speaking into microphones exclusively designated for that purpose (ie. not for singing). On an IEM recording, you'd be able to hear them talking to each other, or perhaps a crew member talking to them (usually between songs). Example: a Dave Matthews Band IEM recording.

While about half of E Street uses IEMs, they don't talk to each other through the system.
[][]And here I thought they were talking to me. Whew, that's a relief. [/]
Could you please detail the reasons for certain bands choosing certain frequencies over others? <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smirk.gif" alt="" /> [/]

each member often will have their own "mix" in their earpiece. Also certain area of the country(ies) have frequencies that are in use for other things, so the band/crew needs to find an oen one to use for their monitors. So with bands with multiple members, there are often many frequencies in use and many different mixes being used.

examples are the U2 IEMs, some are from the Edge and some are from larry's. the DMB IEMs have band chatter on hem as they talk to rach other thru them and some of the reunion IEMs have the Gary Tallent mix of bass heavy so he can hear what he is playing.

Drew
[] and some of the reunion IEMs have the Gary Tallent mix of bass heavy so he can hear what he is playing.[/]

Should be worth noting that it's not just the Garry mix IEMs that have a particular instrument pushed up in the mix -- the same is true of the Danny and Roy IEM recordings have have made it to the trading pool.

In fact, the same is true of the Clarence and Max IEMs as well (although those recordings aren't in the trading pool).
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