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If only all those who are declaring they were done with Springsteen weren't full of shit we could move back into theaters. Entitled and ignorant, the fan base never changes. I have not bought tickets. I will not buy over priced tickets. I'm not mad about 1st day sale. I have no fear of missing out. I will go to any show I want (Not trying for Hollywood that show is designed to be expensive). I will pay under $100 (likely $50). I am at complete peace with no tickets because I understand ticket sales and I know 1st day sale is idiots day.

I don't feel that entitlement to lock up dirt cheap front row or pit tickets 7 months in advance. Only an idiot would think that. And that is why BTX is in an uproar and band members wives are being harassed on Twitter. Because the fan base is mostly idiots.

Last tour they were mad that tickets sold out in 3 minutes. Now they are mad that tickets are available but expensive. The solution hasn't changed. STOP THINKING YOU ARE ENTITLED TO BARGAIN PRICES SEVEN MONTHS IN ADVANCE. That peace of mind is expensive.

So shove your open letters up your  ignorant asses. Everyone is angry just as always with every initial on sale since the internet got us out of lines at record stores. But most of that anger is from their own ignorance. That NBTB podcast guy has been explaining dynamic pricing on the BTX board for months. It is not complicated. It is market driven. It is basic Supply and Demand economics.

Wait and get a decent price as prices level out or buy on day 1 and get gouged. If your peace of mind is worth 2 grand more power to you.



You are not entitled to the best seats 7 months in advance for bargain bin prices but that is exactly what all the crying is about.

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@FrankM posted:

Haha. Or what was that thing just before that, it was a newsgroup, arguments all over, that's where I first met CJ. He posted that he was starting the SPL Server to host bootlegs, then that morphed into this group.

There was the FTP site with the endless password requests.  I honestly can't remember how we communicated back then.

01000111 01101111 00100000 01000011 01100001 01110000 01110011

@Phisherman posted:

If only all those who are declaring they were done with Springsteen weren't full of shit we could move back into theaters. Entitled and ignorant, the fan base never changes. I have not bought tickets. I will not buy over priced tickets. I'm not mad about 1st day sale. I have no fear of missing out. I will go to any show I want (Not trying for Hollywood that show is designed to be expensive). I will pay under $100 (likely $50). I am at complete peace with no tickets because I understand ticket sales and I know 1st day sale is idiots day.

I don't feel that entitlement to lock up dirt cheap front row or pit tickets 7 months in advance. Only an idiot would think that. And that is why BTX is in an uproar and band members wives are being harassed on Twitter. Because the fan base is mostly idiots.

Last tour they were mad that tickets sold out in 3 minutes. Now they are mad that tickets are available but expensive. The solution hasn't changed. STOP THINKING YOU ARE ENTITLED TO BARGAIN PRICES SEVEN MONTHS IN ADVANCE. That peace of mind is expensive.

So shove your open letters up your  ignorant asses. Everyone is angry just as always with every initial on sale since the internet got us out of lines at record stores. But most of that anger is from their own ignorance. That NBTB podcast guy has been explaining dynamic pricing on the BTX board for months. It is not complicated. It is market driven. It is basic Supply and Demand economics.

Wait and get a decent price as prices level out or buy on day 1 and get gouged. If your peace of mind is worth 2 grand more power to you.



You are not entitled to the best seats 7 months in advance for bargain bin prices but that is exactly what all the crying is about.

Fisherman,

At first mainly cuz you got good Videos I thought you worked for Nugs.

Then I thought maybe you were Landau's son but nahhhhh.

Then I thought you must have stock in TM... maybe

But after this rant and tutorial on Trump economic's I think I figured out who you are.  First Name... Jared, aye???   

____________________________________

The SPL Rocks!

 

Pulled up to my house today
Came and took my little girl away!
Giants Stadium 8/28/03



Oats

Despite the scalping, what’s really disgusting is the hate and bullying that’s happening to The E-Streeters and their families. WTF do those retards think Amy (Lofgren) and Maureen (van Zandt) have to take any responsibility regarding ticket prices?  what’s wrong with them to address  them on social media? Dumbasses

For any of you who don't go to Backstreets news regularly, here's their response to this fiasco.

http://www.backstreets.com/news.html

FREEZE-OUT
Lord won't you tell us, tell us what does it mean?
It's four in the morning and raining. We're feeling old, listening to the outcries of fans feeling similarly betrayed by last week's ticket sales, and remembering that things were different a decade ago.

Because we know our audience, the fans, and count ourselves among them, it feels unnecessary to recap here what transpired on Wednesday when Ticketmaster's first U.S. onsales for the 2023 Tour left many Bruce Springsteen fans in a state of shocked disbelief.

But if you need a catch-up we can point you to Variety, industry observer Bob Lefsetz, or to practically any news outlet of your choice to get the broad strokes of what happened. Call it what you like: market pricing, dynamic pricing, surge pricing, Platinum pricing. Just don't call it The New Normal.

Please.

From our point of view, this so-called premium, algorithm-driven model violates an implicit contract between Bruce Springsteen and his fans, one in which the audience side of the equation appeared to truly matter — and in fact was crucial. We believed it because he told us repeatedly it was true. We can imagine Lefsetz and others, perhaps, snickering here, but we still know our audience: we've all been made to feel we're part of an ongoing conversation, one in which we were all "in conce a vital element of the formula: "If you're here, and we're here… they're here.”

If you're not here… where does that leave them?

This past week, too many Springsteen fans got thrown to the wolves, pushed aside in a way that seems as unfathomable as it was avoidable. The artist has maintained that he understands the essential role of his audience. How, then, did we end up facing, in far too many instances, prices for tickets that exceeded normalcy, then departed from reality entirely by orders of magnitude?

One might cite inflation, market value, or any number of factors; we'd argue that it can't be "market forces” when supply is purposefully obfuscated, then manipulated by the platform of distribution. But from our point of view, it boils down to the stark difference between inside and outside. So many fans who have always gone to the shows, who have always been part of This Thing of Ours, now can't go, will not be inside, will not be part of the conversation, purely because they can't pay the cost to see the Boss.

Bruce Springsteen tickets have been historically and notoriously difficult to obtain. That's the nature of the beast, with so many wanting to witness the power and the glory of rock 'n' roll, and relatively few seats to hold them. But the issue has rarely been the money.

Over many years, there have been continuous, clear efforts made by the Springsteen camp to keep things fair and as fan-centric as possible, to foil scalpers, to give average concert-goers and fans the best shot at a reasonable price in a world where bots run rampant and scalpers rule.

For decades, Springsteen kept his ticket prices significantly lower than what the market might bear, which felt in keeping with his brand, his stated philosophies, his belief in community, and his clear view of what a concert was supposed to be, as for three hours or so — and sometimes more — he and the band gave us a glimpse of a better world.

The tent over E Street has always been big, inviting, and open, but what about the question he began to ask in 2012… are we missing anybody? After this week, it sure appears the answer has changed.

What were we to think when we made it through the queue on Wednesday morning to find that tickets — initial sales, not resales — were on offer for thousands of dollars? In the past, no matter how difficult tickets were to score, persistence paid off. Now, it seems, persistence just ratchets the algorithm up another notch. Or four.

Surely, these multi-thousand-dollar prices were not intended or anticipated, many of us thought. Some assert the algorithm got out of control — are we sure that it was ever in control? We'd never expect Ticketmaster to balk at making money, but surely, many believed, Springsteen would put a stop to it and demand adjustments to the system, if not an overhaul, before the next onsale. Friday came with a general repeat of circumstances and even more fans in disbelief.

As recently as last month's European offering, we've seen Ticketmaster cancel an onsale when conditions called for it and reschedule for the following day. So if these prices were unintentional, it's hard to imagine a good reason for the second onsale, let alone a third. For the ticketsellers, the end result of dynamic pricing must be a feature and not a bug.

And that is a foundation-breaking, worldview-shaking notion.

Wait a minute. We thought it was raining. Is it not raining? That might be a takeaway from data Ticketmaster just shared with us, suggesting that the rain is an illusion. Variety reports these Ticketmaster-provided stats, a series of figures that don't quite add up, that obscure more than clarify. If nothing else, the data shared say nothing about outrageously priced tickets fans declined in horror, only telling us what did sell. In the end, these numbers only leave us with more questions. The biggest one being, if it's not raining, why are we getting soaked?

At a time when we needed to feel hope and promise — when the world seems on fire, when we've suffered through escalating deception, greed, fear, isolation, racial strife, violence, "alternative facts,” democracy literally under threat, and an ongoing global pandemic — we're left feeling further disillusioned, downhearted, and dispirited.

But the ideals Springsteen's music puts forward — they're still alive, aren't they? Whether in the grooves or in concert, wherever those guitars ring out? In our shared spirit? If one can't say yes — if only for a few hours every so often — then maybe the magic really is just tricks.

Springsteen has been paid a king's ransom, and we've never begrudged him that, either. Not the reported $500 million sale of his life's work, which hardly fazed us, not the Broadway prices, not the Jeep commercial. We believe in the value of his music, his work; those other transactions and the arenas in which they take place feel beyond our purview.

What happens in the actual physical arenas, where every few years Springsteen and his audience come together to create something bigger than all of us — and everybody has a decent shot to be part of it, at a reasonable price — that's something that remains worth fighting for. Because in rock 'n' roll, as we've come to believe, one plus one does equal three.

It still does, doesn't it?

- By the Editors - July 24, 2022


 

"I've done my best to live the right way"

Can't get through it. So much garbage in the first 3 paragraphs I just bail. Ticket buyers have always been angry and ignorant. This sale is like that on steroids. (PS to Chris Philips, Don't go to any shows in solidarity to all these (perceived) fans who have "been shut out" 7-9 months before there is anything to be shut out of)

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