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Dear Bruce Springsteen,

I've been following you since late 1973,  My first show was in January 1974.

Since 1974, I've been to many, many shows and concerts... too many to count but over 300. I've seen you up and down the East Coast from Boston to Florida, across the Mid-West and on to California. I've seen you in Europe.

Now we're coming out of a Pandemic, maybe?  Inflation is through the roof, people have been sick or died.  The dollar doesn't go as far as it used to.

I cannot understand why after all these years you've raised the price of tickets to the scale that you have?  My wife and I along with three other couples have followed you and the band around for years.  I cannot justify paying these prices when I have a daughter and two grandchildren that I help out.

The sister of one in our group lives in Florida which had their ticket sale already.  She paid 1500.00 for 2 GA's.

Bruce all of us are hoping you will step in and do something about these outrageous prices.  You don't want this to be part of your great legacy.

Please, please lower your prices Bruce.

Thank you for all the great shows.  I know this tour will be great also.  I just won't be able to see as many, if any.

Oats

If anyone else wants to write a letter to Bruce on this same topic. Please do so below.  Be polite, no cussing or terrible insults or it will be deleted by mgmt.

____________________________________

The SPL Rocks!

 

Pulled up to my house today
Came and took my little girl away!
Giants Stadium 8/28/03



Oats

Last edited by Oats
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Only been going to shows since 1999 and, outside of The Rising tour, usually only see him when he comes to my town (once our twice a tour).  So this means I will most likely not see him at all on this tour (which I think sucks more than only seeing him 2 times instead of 10). 

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Look, this removes the resale market…the reality is that the tickets still sold…so, is Bruce and Ticketmaster wrong?  
I refused to buy at this outrageous price…it would be my second missed tour since 1978 (I would not go to broadway for $750 either).   Luckily I have been to scores of shows…

I am just disappointed that this is where we all end up

@rlhblh posted:

Look, this removes the resale market…the reality is that the tickets still sold…so, is Bruce and Ticketmaster wrong?  
I refused to buy at this outrageous price…it would be my second missed tour since 1978 (I would not go to broadway for $750 either).   Luckily I have been to scores of shows…

I am just disappointed that this is where we all end up

why are you assuming 7 months out that you are missing the tour because you didn't buy on suckers day? You do understand nobody needs a ticket yet? Nobody needs one for 7 months.

@rlhblh posted:

Look, this removes the resale market…the reality is that the tickets still sold…so, is Bruce and Ticketmaster wrong?  
I refused to buy at this outrageous price…it would be my second missed tour since 1978 (I would not go to broadway for $750 either).   Luckily I have been to scores of shows…

I am just disappointed that this is where we all end up

I don't see how you can say it removes the resale market.  All those ticket resalers still got tickets and if they don't than someone else has.  All this has done is put a huge price increase on an item in demand.

I'll give you an example, let's say Amazon has most of these tickets for sale so they put up 10 of them for 500.00 each.  Now the resalers know that price if you were a resaler would you sell it for $300.00 of course not.  This artificially raised prices from the get go.   I'd love to know the actual number of Virtual Fan offers that went out.  This entire set up reeks of fraud.

At least in the past it was all transparent and everyone had the same chance.

Let's see what happens when Philly goes on sale?

____________________________________

The SPL Rocks!

 

Pulled up to my house today
Came and took my little girl away!
Giants Stadium 8/28/03



Oats

@Oats posted:

I don't see how you can say it removes the resale market.  All those ticket resalers still got tickets and if they don't than someone else has.  All this has done is put a huge price increase on an item in demand.

I'll give you an example, let's say Amazon has most of these tickets for sale so they put up 10 of them for 500.00 each.  Now the resalers know that price if you were a resaler would you sell it for $300.00 of course not.  This artificially raised prices from the get go.   I'd love to know the actual number of Virtual Fan offers that went out.  This entire set up reeks of fraud.

At least in the past it was all transparent and everyone had the same chance.

Let's see what happens when Philly goes on sale?

Maybe stop worrying about seeing what happens when shows go on-sale. That is the worst day to buy tickets. It was before dynamic pricing and it still is.

When 100,000 people all try to buy the 1000 pit tickets at the same time nobody is going to come out happy no matter what the system. Lets talk about seeing what happens on show day. The day we actually need a ticket. The best day to buy a ticket. Can't we wait and see what happens then? Why is everyone so mad they can't lock up their tickets 7 months in advance? On the hardest day to get a ticket? Nobody needs a ticket today NOBODY.

Bobby Olivier in NJ.com  Here             

Copied and pasted for those who might have trouble:                                                             Bruce  Springsteen does not care about you | Opinion
Published: Jul. 21, 2022             

By Bobby Olivier | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com
Many jilted Bruce Springsteen fans were still fuming Thursday morning, and for good cause. As some of The Boss’s 2023 U.S. concert dates went on sale Wednesday, prospective buyers were met with massive sticker shock — floor seats skyrocketing to more than $4,000 each retail, due to Ticketmaster’s “Official Platinum” dynamic pricing model, which allows costs to fluctuate based on supply and demand.

After my story reporting the unruly price hikes published Wednesday, I received dozens of emails from irate fans, most of whom repeated the same sentiment: Springsteen, the artist who has defined his career by singing about working-class and disenfranchised Americans, has forgotten his fans. They mirrored the notes I was sent in 2017, when “Springsteen on Broadway” tickets climbed to $850 each for orchestra seats.     

And in both cases, who could blame such resentment? It is exceedingly clear that Bruce Springsteen does not care how much a given fan spends to see him play. If he did care, the rock icon who recently sold the rights to his publishing catalog for a cool $500 million — and whose concert tours typically rake in around $200 million at the box office — would refuse to work with Ticketmaster, finance the shows himself, buy permits to use unoccupied fields across America and set a ticket price he alone could control. He’d call it Brucestock or something and pocket considerably less from the fans who’ve supported him for half a century.

But, of course, he won’t do this, because no one does. As with all A-list acts, fans expect Springsteen to play their local arena or stadium, those venues usually have binding contracts with promotional juggernaut Live Nation to operate the performances, and Live Nation merged with Ticketmaster in 2009, creating a smothering entertainment conglomerate that essentially forces artists — who in many cases must also adhere to the desires of their record labels, which in turn have deep-seated relationships with Live Nation and Ticketmaster — to use Ticketmaster to fill their shows, turning a blind eye as fans are price-gouged over and over.   

The great irony is that just before the ‘09 merger, Springsteen and his longtime manager Jon Landau condemned the move in an open letter, saying it would be “returning us to a near monopoly situation in music ticketing” as they also railed against Ticketmaster directing their fans to a secondary site to purchase seats for inflated prices.

Yet 13 years later, here we are again.

So perhaps it’s not that Springsteen doesn’t care about his fans, but if he did care, what would it matter? There are too many variables, too many hands in the cookie jar. Repeated requests sent to spokespeople for Springsteen, Live Nation and Ticketmaster for comment were not answered Wednesday or Thursday, but as someone who has covered the live music industry for a decade, this is my educated guess as to what happened Wednesday: Springsteen was surely aware that demand to see his first concert tour in seven years would be exceedingly high. It was also likely he knew his ticket prices on Ticketmaster could fluctuate based on demand — an increasing trend over the last few years, especially since shows returned after the pandemic shutdown (and the industry lost $9.7 billion in ticket sales in 2020 alone).

But I’m not so sure he fully understood retail prices for floor seats — which were only $164 after fees on his last tour in 2016 (using MetLife Stadium prices) — could balloon to more than $4,300 each at face value. Typically, those outlandish prices are saved for “ticket brokers” (see: scalpers) reselling tickets on secondary market sites like Stubhub and SeatGeek at unholy markups.

By no means should Springsteen be let off the hook, however. You’d be a fool to assume Landau and Bruce’s agent didn’t understand what could and would happen. At the very least, he should release a statement explaining his involvement and apologize to his droves of lifelong fans who feel as though they’ve been priced out for good and will never be able to see him perform again. Any and all backlash is deserved; it’s his name on the stub.

Springsteen’s upcoming area shows, in Newark (April 14), New York (April 1), Brooklyn (April 3) and Philadelphia (March 16) don’t go on sale until next Friday, July 29 (Philly goes on sale July 26), and another wave of price hikes and subsequent frustration should be expected. Can anything actually be done before then to rectify this problem, where tippy-top arena nosebleeds jump to more than $200 a pop, as they already have in other Tampa, Tulsa and Denver?

The short answer is no. The fact is, no matter what the price is, someone will eventually pay it. Perhaps not $4,300, but as Ticketmaster’s dynamic pricing presumably would allow that price to slowly fall, someone will grab it around, say, $1,000. Other ravenous fans will cave at the last moment and reason that if they don’t go now, Springsteen — 73 years old by the time this tour happens — may never stop by again.

From an economist’s standpoint, one could argue that due to the scarcity of a live concert experience and its finite amount of tickets, allowing for dynamic pricing actually values those seats at what they’re really worth. Free market, capitalism, blah, blah — it’s all cold comfort for any middle-class fan who’s listened to Springsteen for 50 years, supported his early tours and now feels left behind. The only true solution would be a federal mandate to create regulations to cap dynamic ticket pricing and give a grain of power back to the buyers. Or artists could band together and refuse to work with Ticketmaster unless these practices were better moderated or eliminated altogether. Yet the odds of either of these doesn’t seem very high. Pearl Jam tried to pull off the latter in the ‘90s. Jump to now and tickets to their upcoming concert in Camden can be purchased on Ticketmaster today. The cheapest available ticket, at “face value”? It’s over $1,000.

And so the grumbling will rightly continue as Springsteen concerts become elitist events — further exemplars of income inequality only affordable to affluent fans or those prepared to skip a few car payments. The haves and the have-nots become “people who go to Springsteen concerts” and “people who watch Springsteen concerts on YouTube.” And the divide between supporters will continue to grow, as some fans will accept that the unparalleled E Street Band live experience is no longer meant for them, while others will continue to act under the delusion that an artist living on his sprawling Colts Neck horse farm somehow remains a populist rocker with their interests at heart — truly his most brilliant disguise.

Bobby Olivier may be reached at bolivier@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @BobbyOlivier and Facebook.

Last edited by FrankM

Bobby Olivier was always contrary towards Bruce.  He started with a small paper and then went to the Bergen Record.  He's been critical of his music since he became a music critic.

That being said there is quite a bit of truth in what he wrote.

____________________________________

The SPL Rocks!

 

Pulled up to my house today
Came and took my little girl away!
Giants Stadium 8/28/03



Oats

@Phisherman posted:

I didn't find any. It sounded like ignorant drivel like the rest of Twitter and BTX the last cpl days. Oh wait, he did mention Bruce is turning 73. That was true.

Olivier, Bob Lefetz and Variety wrote some good stuff. But then everyone in the world is an idiot except you. Man, you are intolerable. You were right about opening sale day being idiot's day. The worst tickets are available then no matter how early you get in. Re Olivier, the writer does not write the headline, the article is softer than that. But Olivier is the newer generation after the old Star Ledger writers who loved Bruce, he's more into newer artists.

Last edited by FrankM

I feel everyone's pain on this, but why shouldn't bruce make what he can. He is doing it through  verified fan, so fans get the tickets. The same fan would have to go pay a scalper $750 or $1500 a ticket. Now that goes directly to Bruce. I had the chance to pay $1000 for GA and I released them. It is a magical experience that I experienced a few times, definitely worth it to someone who hasn't. I was more comfortable paying $335 a ticket in the back if the floor. Even that It took me a few clicks and releases. Hopefully this hurts the secondary market.

Bruce's core fans are well into their years and can afford this and he knows it. If anyone at anytime didn't think he was selling you something this opens your eyes. What he sells is awesome, but he is still selling it.

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